Griffin | Entrepreneurship
 
Resume Table of Contents  

Entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurship Intro
Exploring Business Opportunities
E-Types

 
State Standards
 
  • E 9.1 Content Standard: Students investigate the nature of small business and entrepreneurship.
  • E 9.1.1 Define entrepreneurship
  • E 9.1.2 Explain why individuals become entrepreneurs
  • E 9.1.3 Explore behavioral characteristics and traits of an entrepreneur
  • E 9.1.4 Examine motives for starting your own business
  • E 9.1.5 Assess the advantages of owning a business versus working for someone
  • E 9.1.6 Categorize types of businesses
  • E 9.1.7 Assess and evaluate the various ways to start your own business

  • E 9.2 Content Standard: Students understand the functions involved generating business/product ideas to contribute to business success
  • E 9.2.1 Identify business/product opportunities (PM:134) (SP)
  • E 9.2.2 Identify methods/techniques to generate a product idea (PM:127) (SP)
  • E 9.2.3 Generate business/product ideas (PM:128) (MN)
  • E 9.2.4 Determine initial feasibility of business/product idea (PM:129) (MN)
Chapter Objectives
 


Student will:

  • Explore 9 different entrepreneur types
  • Assess your own E-Type
  • Examine personal traits and interests
  • Examine personal abilities and talents
  • Generate and evaluate business ideas
Why learn E-Types?
 
  • Finding the right business is different for every person. It depends on your interests, your background, your skills, your personality, your financial situation, and your abilities. Understanding your E-Type will help you find a business that best suits you.
1.

What Type of Entrepreneur You Are

Objective: Find out which of the nine E-Type personality traits and working styles you identify with.

Rhonda Abrams, CEO of The Planning Shop, tells you how anyone can start a small business, if you choose the business carefully. It all depends on what she calls your 'E-Type.' That is, what type of entrepreneur you are.

  1. Read What makes a good small business owner?
  2. Watch the USA Today Video 2 (3 min)
  3. Take the E-Type Assessment
    1. Note 1: Assessment and pie chart best done in same class period.
    2. Note 2: Print Screen the assessment results into Word.
    3. Note 3: Write/note each category on your pie chart.
  4. Open My E-Type Report and complete.
  5. Use the E-Type Summary Help to cut and paste the results and pie chart into your summary.
  6. Get the E-Type Packet and complete the summary.

  7. E-Type Presentation - Blank Notes
2.

Examining Your Interests

Objective: Examine your interests and abilities, and then prioritize those so you can generate business ideas of your own.

If you’re interested in cooking, anyone can tell you that you could become a chef. But that’s just a starting point. You might become a caterer, cooking instructor, organic farmer, food safety consultant, gift basket maker or weight loss counselor.

This goal of this exercise is to examine your interests and abilities, and then prioritize those so you can generate business ideas of your own.

  1. Get the Interest Area Worksheet from the teacher.
  2. Write your name and E-Type on page 1
  3. Complete pages 2 and 3 in detail - no blank answers
  4. Circle your interest levels on pages 4 and 5 - no blank answers
  5. Describe the details about your top 5 interests (only your top five)
3.

Examining Your Abilities and Talents

 
 


Objective:
Since you’re not necessarily interested in everything you’re good at, and you’re not necessarily skilled in everything that interests you, it’s important to consider both interests and real skill sets.

Just about any skill that has historically been harnessed to fulfill a traditional job can be turned into a small business venture. Likewise, people are increasingly leveraging their hobbies to build successful businesses.

Traditional job/hobby Entrepreneurial application
Skilled cook/baker Open a restaurant, bakery, catering company; start a line of specialty food products
Associate in law firm Open your own legal practice; contract your services to other law firms
Clotheshorse Open a retail clothing store; design clothes; start a fashion company
Engineer in large manufacturing company Found a startup based on a new idea in your field; become a consultant to manufacturing companies
Sports enthusiast Develop new equipment; open sporting goods store; offer personal training services; start a sports camp
Animal lover Open a grooming business; offer pet training services; open a doggie daycare facility; start a dog walking service
  1. Get the Ability & Talent Worksheet from the teacher.
  2. Write your name and E-Type on page 1
  3. Complete page 2 in detail - no blank answers
  4. Circle your interest level on pages 3 and 4 - no blank answers
  5. Describe the details about your top 5 interests (only your top five)
4.

Generating Business Ideas

 
 


Objective:
The worksheet is designed to get your creative juices flowing, so that you can generate business concepts you may not have considered before. The goal is to go beyond obvious business choices.

Review the business idea brainstorm example then using the resources listed below, research business ideas that include obvious and not so obvious ideas.  Your goal is to generate every business idea, even some that may appear unrealistic or a far reach. (Note: I'm asking for Types of Business. Ads is not a type of business but Selling Ads would be.)

Create your own brainstorm worksheet based on your top two abilities or interests. List enough detail so I can understand your business. Only include a few unrealistic ideas. (i.e. play professional sports)

5.

Articles

 
6. Optional – Online E-Type Study Guide
 
7

E-Type Quiz - 23 mc, 2 short answer

 

Additional Resources

A.

http://www.usatoday.com/money/smallbusiness/startup/week1.htm

Can You Make It as an Entrepreneur



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